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Industry Reviews

23/07/2014
 
Transport Resilience Review  - A review of the resilience of the transport network to extreme weather events
 
Last winter saw much disruption of our transport networks because of the prolonged period of extreme weather, with many thousands of passengers and road users impacted. Transport operators, highway authorities, emergency responders and many communities worked exceptionally and commendably hard in often challenging conditions to restore services and repair damage caused by the high winds, storms and flooding.

But the winter's events also pose the question of how our transport systems could be made more resilient, so as to reduce the level of disruption from extreme weather in future. This question can only be of growing importance as there is a widening consensus and understanding that climate change will increase the frequency of extreme weather events in future years. The purpose of this Independent Review, commissioned by the Secretary of State for Transport, has been to answer that question and produce practical recommendations on how we can strengthen the resilience of our transport systems and learn the lessons from last winter.

This will also be ever more important in future as travel and freight transport demands on our transport systems continue to grow. The UK already has some of the most intensively used roads, railways, ports and airports in the world, meaning that any disruption is felt by more people more quickly than elsewhere. Ensuring they are as resilient as practicable must be an important economic and social priority for our country.

There is no silver bullet or instant solution to make our transport systems more resilient, instead it is a task of attending to one hundred and one details. But by prioritising our efforts, applying already good practices much more widely and ensuring that transport operators and authorities learn continuously from other's experience as well as their own, there is much that can be achieved. It will not be possible to make our transport systems totally resilient, the forces of nature will still on occasions prove too powerful, but where there is disruption there is more that can be done to minimise its duration and impact, and to improve how passengers and road users are communicated with. To read the full document please visit here